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  • Another E5 Image

    This is a Landscape shot (in case anyone thought I only shoot wildlife) using the Sigma 50-500 at fl of 50mm, ISO 800 and aperture f10.


    Click here for larger image.

    This is a good image to test colours, detail etc. I think it came out rather well at an ISO I would never have attempted to use before for this type of shot. I know I can go higher and still get a good quality image.
    Kind regards

    Peter
    www.imageinuk.com

  • #2
    Re: Another E5 Image

    f/10 is past the sweet spot for resolution in Four Thirds too. 5.6-8 is what to aim for.

    Ian
    Founder/editor
    Digital Photography Now (DPNow.com)
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
    Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
    Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/

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    • #3
      Re: Another E5 Image

      Originally posted by Ian View Post
      f/10 is past the sweet spot for resolution in Four Thirds too. 5.6-8 is what to aim for.

      Ian
      Hi Ian
      You are correct of course and I normally try to fix around f8. Guess it is the excitement in trying out the camera Well, thats my excuse
      Kind regards

      Peter
      www.imageinuk.com

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      • #4
        Re: Another E5 Image

        Originally posted by Ian View Post
        f/10 is past the sweet spot for resolution in Four Thirds too. 5.6-8 is what to aim for.

        Ian
        Purely out of interest, cos I don't know the answer, would this also be the case if the lens had been at 500mm or is there no difference
        Stephen

        sigpic

        Check out my BLOG too


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        • #5
          Re: Another E5 Image

          Originally posted by Stephen View Post
          Purely out of interest, cos I don't know the answer, would this also be the case if the lens had been at 500mm or is there no difference
          I wasn't referring to the lens characteristics. It's a down to the sensor size/pixel pitch and aperture, regardless of focal length. Beyond a certain aperture (reducing its diameter, so increasing the f-number value) diffraction will cause the maximum possible resolution of the camera to be reduced (in other words the image will get progressively softer beyond a threshold aperture).

          With Olympus/Panasonic Four Thirds cameras with 12 megapixel sensors the threshold is about f/9. With the older 5MP sensor of the Olympus E-1 the threshold is about f/12.

          With your Canon EOS-5D Mark II the limit is about f/12, and your 8MP 1D it's about f/14.

          A Canon 18MP APS-C sensor camera has its threshold at about f/9.

          A typical 14MP compact camera is limited to around f/3.5 before diffraction softening kicks in.

          Ian
          Founder/editor
          Digital Photography Now (DPNow.com)
          Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
          Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
          Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Another E5 Image

            I'm watching this one out of interest too.

            I reckon the image Peter has shown looks good, certainly very acceptable, no problems whatsoever imho.

            As for ISO 800 at 500mm ... not an unual setting for wildlife and birds. Getting the shot is what matters of course but I suspect this kit's gonna cut the mustard. If so I can see why people are chuffed with the E5.

            Pol

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            • #7
              Re: Another E5 Image

              Originally posted by Ian View Post
              I wasn't referring to the lens characteristics. It's a down to the sensor size/pixel pitch and aperture, regardless of focal length. Beyond a certain aperture (reducing its diameter, so increasing the f-number value) diffraction will cause the maximum possible resolution of the camera to be reduced (in other words the image will get progressively softer beyond a threshold aperture).

              With Olympus/Panasonic Four Thirds cameras with 12 megapixel sensors the threshold is about f/9. With the older 5MP sensor of the Olympus E-1 the threshold is about f/12.

              With your Canon EOS-5D Mark II the limit is about f/12, and your 8MP 1D it's about f/14.

              A Canon 18MP APS-C sensor camera has its threshold at about f/9.

              A typical 14MP compact camera is limited to around f/3.5 before diffraction softening kicks in.

              Ian
              Thanks Ian for the info. Whilst I'm aware of the so called sweet spot, as a photographer I often have to consider the depth of focus more. If I want to get sharp focus throughout the photo, or indeed limited depth of focus, this can be more important. I'm doing a job on Monday for example where I will be photographing aisles in a supermarket and the depth of focus is the priority. Doing a landscape with no foreground or a flat subject where dof is not a priority, then I can see the sweet spot could be the priority
              Stephen

              sigpic

              Check out my BLOG too


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              • #8
                Re: Another E5 Image

                Originally posted by Stephen View Post
                Thanks Ian for the info. Whilst I'm aware of the so called sweet spot, as a photographer I often have to consider the depth of focus more. If I want to get sharp focus throughout the photo, or indeed limited depth of focus, this can be more important. I'm doing a job on Monday for example where I will be photographing aisles in a supermarket and the depth of focus is the priority. Doing a landscape with no foreground or a flat subject where dof is not a priority, then I can see the sweet spot could be the priority
                Absolutely - there is a balancing act to be done between depth of field and the diffraction limit threshold. Peter's shot of a distant scene at 50mm didn't require f/10, which he concurs

                When doing product photography I'm often stopping the lens down to f/16 or f/22 in order to get more depth of field.

                Ian
                Founder/editor
                Digital Photography Now (DPNow.com)
                Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
                Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
                Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/

                Comment

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