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My New Hard Drive

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  • JSR
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Ian View Post
    Our maths department had a Ti programmable calculator as well - which ran an obligatory moon lander program I must be a bit older than you because I was about 21 when the BBC Micro came out but when I was in the 6th form we did have an Apple II clone (ITT 2020) and a Commodore Pet

    Ian
    I can't recall too much about the calculator other than it having a red LED screen. It could be programmed with number games - it could probably do a lot more, but I was more interested in the Pet.

    Our school got our BBC Micros just in time for me to start my O-Levels, which was handy.

    Leave a comment:


  • JSR
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Ian View Post
    The oldest computer I still have is an Acorn RiscPC, circa 1994, the last commercially produced Acorn range - it had a 30MHz ARM610 processor and I think mine has 8MB RAM. From memory it was fitted with a 100MB hard drive. It's sitting here in my office, complete with quite a range of accessories and an original monitor. Apparently it's still worth a fair bit.

    My oldest working computer is a 2002 Sony Vaio C1MHP Picture Book. It has an 8.9 inch screen but very high resolution at 1280x600. It runs XP:



    I upgraded the hard drive from 30GB to 60GB. It has a fantastic screen and it's tiny too, but the Transmeta Crusoe processor was just simply too slow. I did use it regularly for 6 years though!

    Ian
    This is a photo of my oldest still-working computer (picture found on the web but it looks like the same thing):


    The battery is now useless, it gets wayyyy too hot to sit on your lap, it does have a floppy drive but it swaps with the AC adapter which has a dodgy cable so the adapter really needs to stay in situ. No USB ports, but it has a parallel port (I have an old PP Iomega Zip drive somewhere). It's looking a bit worse for wear now around the hinges, but it still fires up and works.

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  • Ian
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Our maths department had a Ti programmable calculator as well - which ran an obligatory moon lander program I must be a bit older than you because I was about 21 when the BBC Micro came out but when I was in the 6th form we did have an Apple II clone (ITT 2020) and a Commodore Pet

    Ian

    Leave a comment:


  • JSR
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Prior to our ZX81, our school had a computer room (or, more accurately, a broom closet) with a ZX80, an Acorn Atom (if memory serves), and a Commodore Pet. Oh and a Texas Instruments programmable calculator.

    A short time after that there was some government school's IT "initiative" and we suddenly had a room full of BBC Micro B computers - with floppy disk drives! We also had a couple of dot-matrix printers and daisywheels.

    A few years later, my brother bought an Acorn Electron and, later still, we had an Amiga 1200 (now that was fun!), before moving onto a PC with a 75MHz processor and 12MB RAM (I think the hard drive was a whopping 1.7GB) - I had to specifically tell the shop that I wanted Windows 95 on it. For a time, we had a more advanced computer than the place I worked at.

    They were the days. Now you can't get by without multiple GBs and GHz all over the place just for the machine to run!

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  • Ian
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    The oldest computer I still have is an Acorn RiscPC, circa 1994, the last commercially produced Acorn range - it had a 30MHz ARM610 processor and I think mine has 8MB RAM. From memory it was fitted with a 100MB hard drive. It's sitting here in my office, complete with quite a range of accessories and an original monitor. Apparently it's still worth a fair bit.

    My oldest working computer is a 2002 Sony Vaio C1MHP Picture Book. It has an 8.9 inch screen but very high resolution at 1280x600. It runs XP:



    I upgraded the hard drive from 30GB to 60GB. It has a fantastic screen and it's tiny too, but the Transmeta Crusoe processor was just simply too slow. I did use it regularly for 6 years though!

    Ian

    Leave a comment:


  • Ian
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    I know we had an original Sinclair ZX80 - but I think it was borrowed. That was the bigger white design that preceded the much more popular ZX81. I never really gelled with Sinclairs and my first home micro was a BBC Model B - 32K of RAM! I had started a computer science degree course but eventually dropped out, partly because of the lure of working in photography! The first computer I had with a hard drive was an Archimedes in 1987 - the hard drive was a whopping 20MB! It frequently refused to boot when the computer was cold. The Archimedes used an ARM2 RISC processor, descendants of which now dominate the mobile phone and tablet computer world. The 32-bit ARM processor was invented by Acorn Computers after the technical team evaluated a step up from 8-bit microprocessors and decided that off the shelf 16-bit CPUs were not good enough. Sophie Wilson (then Roger Wilson) who wrote BBC Basic also designed the instructions set for the ARM RISC processor. Sophie was for a while a member of the DPNow forum as she is a keen photographer.

    Ian

    Leave a comment:


  • JSR
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Ian View Post
    Not only do I remember Windows 95, but I used to use the version of Windows before that! And a rival system called GEM... but my first PC in 1992 was a 25MHz 486SX processor and 4MB of RAM - not sure what size the hard disk was but it was pretty small by today's standards - only a few hundred megabytes.

    Before that I used Acorn gear BBC Micros, Acorn Archimedes (I used to write for several Acorn mags) and I also dabbled with Commodore Amigas. I also had an 8-bit CP/M (kind of the precursor to the PC and DOS) system running as a co-processor on my BBC Micro. Come to think of it I also ran DOS under emulation on the Archimedes
    My oldest "working" laptop here is my Digital HiNote VP. Just 16MB RAM, 1GB HDD, Pentium 120 (I think). It's running Windows 98SE just fine (came with Win95) - no CD drive, so I had to copy the files across to the HDD and install from there. It's staggering to compare how high are the specs required for today's OSes.

    My first computer, though, was our ZX81. 1K RAM. And we thought we were onto a good thing when we got the 16K RAM pack. We didn't know that we needed multiple terabytes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Ian View Post
    Not only do I remember Windows 95, but I used to use the version of Windows before that! And a rival system called GEM... but my first PC in 1992 was a 25MHz 486SX processor and 4MB of RAM - not sure what size the hard disk was but it was pretty small by today's standards - only a few hundred megabytes.

    Before that I used Acorn gear BBC Micros, Acorn Archimedes (I used to write for several Acorn mags) and I also dabbled with Commodore Amigas. I also had an 8-bit CP/M (kind of the precursor to the PC and DOS) system running as a co-processor on my BBC Micro. Come to think of it I also ran DOS under emulation on the Archimedes

    Back to the present day, another bus interface that is potentially useful and which many PCs are equipped with is eSATA; a connector for external devices connecting to the same SATA controller as the hard drive inside your PC. It sometimes comes as a dual function eSATA/USB port.

    Ian

    PS Audrey - has Patrick solved your problem or do you need further help?
    Hi Ian
    Looking back when I got a 1 GB hard drive I thought "wow"never fill this, how wrong can you be? Now we talk TB and I have a 1 TB and 2 TB (raid1 so 1 TB) almost full.

    I had hoped on another note to be seeing adapters that could utilise USB3 on a Thunderbolt ports. There is of sorts from some third party manufacturers but they are also very expensive, so I feel I might as well go for the real thing. Do you know of any products in the pipe line.
    I wish now I had been more patient and waited for the new iMac that will have USB3 ports, but there you go, I didn't.
    According to one of Audrey's reply's she is now up and running.

    Patrick

    Leave a comment:


  • Ian
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Not only do I remember Windows 95, but I used to use the version of Windows before that! And a rival system called GEM... but my first PC in 1992 was a 25MHz 486SX processor and 4MB of RAM - not sure what size the hard disk was but it was pretty small by today's standards - only a few hundred megabytes.

    Before that I used Acorn gear BBC Micros, Acorn Archimedes (I used to write for several Acorn mags) and I also dabbled with Commodore Amigas. I also had an 8-bit CP/M (kind of the precursor to the PC and DOS) system running as a co-processor on my BBC Micro. Come to think of it I also ran DOS under emulation on the Archimedes

    Back to the present day, another bus interface that is potentially useful and which many PCs are equipped with is eSATA; a connector for external devices connecting to the same SATA controller as the hard drive inside your PC. It sometimes comes as a dual function eSATA/USB port.

    Ian

    PS Audrey - has Patrick solved your problem or do you need further help?

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Autumn View Post
    That all seems very complicated and expensive. Originally I was going for a 1 TB but then went for 2TB and you are having a 4TB. I am sure I only had 64Kb on my first computer and had to keep putting in floppy disks for the programs and to save my work to!
    Unfortunately Thunderbolt drives are more expensive, disappointingly so, it is difficult to se why, particularly as USB3 is much cheaper, but I don't have USB3 (the new iMac announced and due out soon) does have USB3 & Thunderbolt.
    I have been waiting for Thunderbolt drives to drop in price, they have but not significantly, the announcement that new Intel motherboards will now have Thunderbolt might increase in demand and thus lead to lower prices due to competition, but its early days yet.
    If I had USB3 I would settle for that, it is still 10 times fast than USB2, Thunderbolt is double that.
    The 4TB used as Raid 1 still only stores 2TB but with a full copy in the one unit.

    I remember installing Windows 98 I think it was 98 from floppy disks, there were over 26 of them.

    How technology has changed things in a relatively short time.

    Patrick

    Leave a comment:


  • Autumn
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    That all seems very complicated and expensive. Originally I was going for a 1 TB but then went for 2TB and you are having a 4TB. I am sure I only had 64Kb on my first computer and had to keep putting in floppy disks for the programs and to save my work to!

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Autumn View Post
    Thank you very much Patrick. They all appear to be there with their adjustments.

    When I right clicked on the "Pictures" folder, "Update folder location" wasn't shown, (it wasn't shown on the individual folders either) but "Find folder" (or something like that) was so I clicked on that and navigated to the F: Drive which holds my images. I clicked on "Pictures" and immediately images started to appear randomly. It took about 30 minutes for all of them to appear.

    The funny thing is, that now they are all there, if I right click on the folders "Update folder location" is now there together with 9 other options. Before the images appeared there were only 3 options of which "Find folder" was one.

    Anyway, now I can breath again and decide what to do with my Buffalo drive 500Gb and another smaller one 250Gb. I need to back up my laptop somehow.

    Once again thanks to you Patrick and to all those who offered their advice before my purchase.
    Glad to be of help, it's worth remembering that if any folder is renamed Lightroom will need to be told, that's when update folder location comes into its own.
    As a matter of interest I intend buying very soon a WD 4TB (contains 2 drives) to be set up as Raid 1 which is mirroring, that is one drive is copied to the other, giving 2TB of storage.
    I have Thunderbolt on the iMac which is even faster than USB3 and that is fast, so I shall be getting the Thunderbolt version. All my images are on an external these days as the new iMac has a SSD very fast but limited in capacity only 250GB , which is why I want Thunderbold.

    Patrick

    Leave a comment:


  • Autumn
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Thank you very much Patrick. They all appear to be there with their adjustments.

    When I right clicked on the "Pictures" folder, "Update folder location" wasn't shown, (it wasn't shown on the individual folders either) but "Find folder" (or something like that) was so I clicked on that and navigated to the F: Drive which holds my images. I clicked on "Pictures" and immediately images started to appear randomly. It took about 30 minutes for all of them to appear.

    The funny thing is, that now they are all there, if I right click on the folders "Update folder location" is now there together with 9 other options. Before the images appeared there were only 3 options of which "Find folder" was one.

    Anyway, now I can breath again and decide what to do with my Buffalo drive 500Gb and another smaller one 250Gb. I need to back up my laptop somehow.

    Once again thanks to you Patrick and to all those who offered their advice before my purchase.

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    Originally posted by Autumn View Post
    I think the photos are on the WD My Book Drive, but I cannot see the drive in the Library Module, even though I have closed and opened LR several times and also restarted my computer.

    However, I can see My Book if I click on import! When I do that, in the import interface, it is listed there with all the other drives on my computer together with the structure of my images.

    How do I get LR to recognise my My Book in the Library Module please?

    Last week I could see My Book in the library module together with my Buffalo drive.
    I obviocly did not explain clearly enough.

    First we must make sure the computer is seeing the WD drive, Lightroom can't do anything with the drive if the Computer can't see it.

    Lightroom does not see any drives untill you tell it where they are, it dousn't work like a regular browser.

    With Lightroom closed and both the Buffalo and WD connected, check in My Computer (windows), Finder (Mac) for all the drives, both Baffallo and WD should show here. If the Buffalo shows but not the WD then there is a fault it could be a bad drive or a faulty cable, try a new cable first or indeed it is seated properly. If you don't have a spare cable pinch one from another periferal. When the WD shows open it by double clicking and check the contents to see if your images are there, if not copy from the buffalo but don't try any of the fancy auto ways simply copy the file you want by copy & past. Now with all the images on your WD follow the following steps, one by one a step at a time.

    1. Unplug the WD drive and ensure the Buffalo drive is connected.
    2. Open Lightroom to ensure your images are showing in the library.
    3. If the images show close Lightroom and unplug the Buffalo.
    4. Open Lightroom your images images should still show but with question marks on each image on the film strip. If you try and open an image you get the message that Lightroom can't find the picture, this is a sign everything is working correctly.
    5. Close Lightroom and re-connect the WD, open Lightroom the images will still show the question marks, and the list in the library will be greyed out and you would still get the message that Lightroom can't find the images, again quite normal at this stage.

    Follow the next steps to tell Lightroom where your WD drive is.

    6. In the library select from the greyed out list the folder or folders that contain your pictures, right click and fron the resulting window select " update folder location" this will show you all the drives on the computer select the WD drive and click choose, if choose is greyed out go to individually sub folder instead and select choose and the folder will be renstated in Lightroom but this time they will be active and not greyed out. Do this with all folder on the WD drive.

    If all this fails or you want to start from scratch antway unplug your Buffalo & your WD , open Lightroom and clear your library of everything, this is to ensure you don't inadvertently erase your data.
    Reconnect the WD. Assuming the computer can see the WD, open Lightroom and select import photos (LT3) or photo & video (LT4) go to "select source" then "other source" your WD drive should be listed in the resulting window that being so, select it and "choose" bottom right of the window, and all images will be imported to the library.

    If you you have renamed your WD (mine I have named Images) that should now be visible in the library. If not it will be the default name of the drive, when you bought it.

    Let me know how you get on

    Patrick

    Leave a comment:


  • Autumn
    replied
    Re: My New Hard Drive

    I think the photos are on the WD My Book Drive, but I cannot see the drive in the Library Module, even though I have closed and opened LR several times and also restarted my computer.

    However, I can see My Book if I click on import! When I do that, in the import interface, it is listed there with all the other drives on my computer together with the structure of my images.

    How do I get LR to recognise my My Book in the Library Module please?

    Last week I could see My Book in the library module together with my Buffalo drive.

    Leave a comment:

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