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  • What - WiFi

    With Nikon bringing out a plugin Wireless Gizmo, and more cameras having the "WiFi" capability. My simple question is:

    What works best

    While a full blown survey is unlikely, if anyone has used such a thing, what were the highs and lows of the system you used

    I havn't searched the net yet, so if there is a ready done review out there, that too would be usefull.

    Graham

  • #2
    Re: What - WiFi

    Not sure what you mean, Graham? Do you mean WiFi v.s. Bluetooth, or which WiFi setup is best?

    One thing that was pointed out to me is that you should not mix slower devices on a Wireless N network - if you can, use two access points, once for G-type devices (54Mb/sec and one for N-type (up to 300Mb/sec) devices exclusively otherwise your N-type network will slow down to the speed of the slowest connected device.

    Ian
    Founder/editor
    Digital Photography Now (DPNow.com)
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
    Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
    Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/

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    • #3
      Re: What - WiFi

      Originally posted by Ian View Post
      Not sure what you mean, Graham? Do you mean WiFi v.s. Bluetooth, or which WiFi setup is best?

      One thing that was pointed out to me is that you should not mix slower devices on a Wireless N network - if you can, use two access points, once for G-type devices (54Mb/sec and one for N-type (up to 300Mb/sec) devices exclusively otherwise your N-type network will slow down to the speed of the slowest connected device.

      Ian
      That's well worth remembering - Thanks

      As for the original question - There are different systems, as you point out, therefore there will be pros & cons for each.

      With the Olympus OM-D, for example, there is the PEN Pal and Eye-Fi cards, I assume Nikon has similar systems that work in different ways depending on the level at which the model is aimed at.

      With Eye-Fi cards some do RAW while others only Jpeg. The range of "systems" seems to be growing, with the new Nikon WU-1a being compatible only with smart devices running the Android OS.

      The idea of any type of "Standard" in this, as with so many other things, is non existent and some systems do things that others don't

      I've resigned myself to not having wireless teathered shooting (without a megabucks investment ) so these alternatives may be the next best thing...

      Any opinions would be welcome.

      Graham

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      • #4
        Re: What - WiFi

        Eye-Fi looks promising. I haven't tried it since it was first demo'd several years ago; I must get one in to try.

        The Nikon WU-1a is Android specific because they have developed the companion app first. It can take longer on the Apple platform, but that's coming later in the year. It's a shame that Nikon has ruled out the possibility of connecting via WU-1a to one's Wireless LAN and to be able to wirelessly access the camera's memory card. DLNA support would have been great. The feedback I got was that Nikon thought that this was too complicated for the level of user they were aiming the D3200 at. I personally think that's short-sighted

        Ian
        Founder/editor
        Digital Photography Now (DPNow.com)
        Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
        Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
        Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What - WiFi

          Originally posted by Ian View Post
          Eye-Fi looks promising. I haven't tried it since it was first demo'd several years ago; I must get one in to try.

          The Nikon WU-1a is Android specific because they have developed the companion app first. It can take longer on the Apple platform, but that's coming later in the year. It's a shame that Nikon has ruled out the possibility of connecting via WU-1a to one's Wireless LAN and to be able to wirelessly access the camera's memory card. DLNA support would have been great. The feedback I got was that Nikon thought that this was too complicated for the level of user they were aiming the D3200 at. I personally think that's short-sighted

          Ian
          It appears to me that the DLNA has only been taken up by those that have multiple products that would use it, such as Sony, Samsung, Panasonic, LG,...

          I see wireless interaction between Tablets, Smart Phones and Cameras as an obvious alternative to camera-phones, providing for better image quality and access to system camera capability.

          Having the live-view feed and camera control to a smartphone, would provide for excellent capability in situations where overhead (or even held high on a mono pod) would gain access to shots that may otherwise not be able to be obtained.

          All this is in addition to the simple ease of downloading images to the computer and/or cloud storage.

          If you do manage to get your hands on a Eye-Fi Card, I'd be interested to know of your review of it.

          Thanks
          Graham

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