Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Angled Spy lenses

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Angled Spy lenses

    Another piece of kit I sometimes ponder and consider is a right angle spy lens - like the Opteka Voyeur Right Angle Spy Lens [ame="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Opteka-Voyeur-Digital-Camera-Lenses/dp/B001TQ1832/ref=pd_rhf_p_t_1"]HERE[/ame]

    Does anyone have one, anyone used one on their dSLR. if so, was it any good or did it just degrade the image file.


    Pol

  • #2
    Re: Angled Spy lenses

    Anything with the word "Voyeur" on it is asking for trouble

    We used mirrors to photograph fast moving objects "head on" or to offer protection to the camera from flying debris. The mirrors are often sacrificial being simply mirror tiles on wooden dowel.

    The results are almost indistinguishable from unreflected shots unless you look for the indications. With a well hooded reflector that is kept very clean, being so close to the lens, hence so far outside the depth of field, the results will be virtually as good as shooting straight through the lens.

    Composition is fun, to say the least, as the mirror being fixed to the lens will give vertical shift for a rotation of the camera but sideways shift is still sideways. Takes a bit of getting used to.

    Why not get a mirror from the 1 shop and build one (in the best traditions of Blue Peter) just to see if it's what you really want.

    Alternatively buy a 500mm Mirror lens and hide in the bushes
    Graham

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Angled Spy lenses

      Originally posted by Graham_of_Rainham View Post
      Anything with the word "Voyeur" on it is asking for trouble

      We used mirrors to photograph fast moving objects "head on" or to offer protection to the camera from flying debris. The mirrors are often sacrificial being simply mirror tiles on wooden dowel.

      The results are almost indistinguishable from unreflected shots unless you look for the indications. With a well hooded reflector that is kept very clean, being so close to the lens, hence so far outside the depth of field, the results will be virtually as good as shooting straight through the lens.

      Composition is fun, to say the least, as the mirror being fixed to the lens will give vertical shift for a rotation of the camera but sideways shift is still sideways. Takes a bit of getting used to.

      Why not get a mirror from the 1 shop and build one (in the best traditions of Blue Peter) just to see if it's what you really want.

      Alternatively buy a 500mm Mirror lens and hide in the bushes

      Thanks for all that, very helpful. I think my husband's just trying to put me off 'cos he tries to pretend he isn't with me when I do my street thing with the 'big black camera'.

      We already have a 500mm Mirror lens (maybe 2 of them) but I was hoping for something that I could use with the Pentax 50-135mm f/2.8 ... something suitable for using closer to the subject. Summick for pointing out to sea, or maybe at a building, as I grabbed candids of peeps walking along the promenade or the high street.

      I was hoping to be inconspicuous so anything I made Blue Peter style, assumning I could manage to make one, would probably be too obvious with sticky-backed plastic or even fall off the camera.

      I'll think about it a while longer and maybe ask our eldest son if he fancies 'sharing' one with me.

      Pol

      Comment

      Working...
      X