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This is where Ian Burley, DPNow's editor and founder, shares his unique thoughts and impressions on subjects that he hopes will be of interest to others on the subjects of digital photography and other related or loosely related topics! You can follow DPNow Editor's blog on Facebook and Twitter, too.
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Eye-eye, I'm over-exposing!

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Posted 31-07-14 at 06:18 PM by Ian

Nope - the more optimistic of you who are mischievously hoping that I've taken a shine to exhibitionism - it's not that. It's my eyes - those two cameras in my head; they have been misbehaving but all in a good cause.

Yesterday I had to get my eyes checked out at the local Glaucoma clinic after routine tests at my opticians (you know, the puff of air in your eyes tests) rated me as borderline for being in danger of exhibiting high eyeball pressures that can cause glaucoma. For the specialist doctor at the clinic to make a full examination of my eyes it was necessary to force my pupils to dilate - chemically. The drug that does this takes quite a long time to wear off. I was told 5-6 hours but 15 hours later first thing this morning I could still see its effects.

If your pupils are dilated all the time everything looks like an over-exposed camera image. Yes, the histogram really gets a shove to the right. Yesterday was a bright and sunny day and so was this morning. This meant a very glary and rather bleak view, forcing me to wear sunglasses more often than not.

It was weird being able to see in shadows when normally details would have been blacked-out. Contrast was very low - where you expect deep dark black tones you see just grey and highlights bleached out and hard to view without squinting. Colours lack saturation. On top of that with your pupils wide open what you see is blurred; rather like the lack of crispness you get with older or not so good camera lenses if they aren't stopped down. It's a weird and rather unpleasant experience.

The medical investigation also involves a sensor probe being placed against your cornea, the front surface of your eye, to measure its thickness and this requires the surface of your eye to be anaesthetised (ego boosted by being able to spell that correctly first time!).

A yellow dye was also droppered into my eyes while the doc scanned my retinas with what I later learned was an infra-red scope. So I've had my eyes' aperture settings opened right up and a yellow filter 'attached'

There is some good news - it turns out that I don't have glaucoma - my eyeball pressures are normal and I passed a peripheral vision test, too. The retinal scan did reveal an unrelated condition that needs further investigation (nothing serious I am told) and a return to the clinic in three months.

So there you are - don't neglect the two cameras that most of us carry around with us all the time - and please look after and care for them!
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Comments

  1. Old Comment

    Glaucoma

    I was diagnosed with glaucoma over 20 years ago. Was treated with eye drops twice a day and regular test. Spot the bunny (field test) as I always called it. Then with the coming of new equipment I was told no you don't have glaucoma just a thickening of the eyeball. So all those hours and prescriptions were of no use at all. Still at least they thought they were looking after me, so can't complain. Glad to hear your eyes are OK.
    Posted 01-08-14 at 09:19 PM by Rodbender Rodbender is offline
  2. Old Comment
    Ian's Avatar
    Yes - my condition is a thicker than normal cornea and is nothing to worry about. This is what made me fail the optician's 'puff' glaucoma pressure test.
    Posted 07-11-14 at 07:19 PM by Ian Ian is offline
 

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